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FTC orders D.C.-area dealership group to stop deceptive - 29 Jun 2019 02:18

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<span>FTC orders D.C.-area dealership group to stop deceptive recall scheme</span>
<p> A group of auto dealerships near Washington, D.C., and a California marketing firm settled claims they deceptively mailed more than 21,000 fake &quot;urgent recall&quot; notices to consumers, the FTC said. </p>

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Source: http://www.autonews.com/article/20181010/RETAIL/181019860/dealerships-settle-ftc-fake-recall-claim - Comments: 0

How Mercedes Honors Its Visual Heritage in the Present— - 26 Jun 2019 02:11

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<p><span class="dropcap G&lt;/span&gt;orden Wagener has served as Mercedes-Benz’s head of design for the last decade, but his stint at the company dates back to 1997. This experience means Wagener is certainly steeped in Benz’s modern history, but he and his team must also attend to the broadest backstory in contemporary automotive production, one that dates to Karl Benz’s foundational role in developing the automobile in the late 19th century and includes the many innovations Mercedes pioneered over the intervening 130 years.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;“Well, definitely &lt;strong&gt;[https://www.automobilemag.com/news/mille-miglia-by-1955-mercedes-benz-300sl-gullwing-224237/" target="_blank AMG GT R Pro]&lt;/strong&gt;, is about to be revealed. “And even back in the 1930s there was some really nice stuff from us, the 540K Autobahnkurier [for example]. I don’t like anything from the ’70s. I hate it. But you must always ask the designer about his own work,” he laughs. “Because he’s always not so much into the work of other people.”&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;img class=" size-content-width="" wp-image-1308927="" aligncenter"="" src="https://st.automobilemag.com/wp-content/mu-plugins/ten-shared/assets/images/_.gif" data-lazy="1" data-base="https://st.automobilemag.com/uploads/sites/11/2018/11/Gorden-Wagener-.jpg?interpolation=lanczos-none&amp;fit=around%7C660:441" alt="" width="660" height="441"></span></p>
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<p>Wagener does admit that there are some clear identifying characteristics and heritage cues that <strong>target=&quot;_blank Mercedes-Benz</strong> vehicles must always include under his watch. “We are still inspired by the cars of the 1930s, with the streamlined, aero teardrop shape,” Wagener says. “We came from a wedge-shape generation, which was very forced, very ’90s, actually. I didn’t like that. I’m more into that anti-wedge, flowing design, which was, again, inspired by the ’30s. Also, the cleanness and the voluptuousness. When you look at classic cars, you see that voluptuousness.”</p>
<p>One of the hardest challenges is taking a long heritage and applying it to upcoming vehicles, which now of course increasingly means techno-heavy EVs and autonomous vehicles. “Some things are timeless and will never change. So the emotional part always stays the same, the sense of attraction. But, the intellectual part changes. It’s a thinking process. You say, ‘This is modern <em>because</em> …’ Or, ‘This is classic <em>because</em> …’ So, for me, it’s not so much about the vehicles. It’s about understanding the brand. And when we did the analysis of what this brand stands for, the simple answer was that it’s a luxury company. We always have been a luxury company,” Wagener says. “But it was a traditional luxury company. A company of the fathers. And we moved the design into a modern luxury company. Into the next generation. And so therefore you have to look at each and every decade to see what was this brand about. Not so much that you take features. You have to be inspired. You have to take the DNA. If you just take features from the past and just do it, then you’ll do retro design. Which is no new level. I hate retro design.”</p>
<p><img class="size-content-width wp-image-1308441 aligncenter" src="https://st.automobilemag.com/wp-content/mu-plugins/ten-shared/assets/images/_.gif" data-lazy="1" data-base="https://st.automobilemag.com/uploads/sites/11/2018/11/2020-Mercedes-AMG-GT-R-Pro-3.jpg?interpolation=lanczos-none&amp;fit=around%7C660:371" alt="" width="660" height="371" /></p>
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<p>Another challenge when dealing with the sheer volume of history and influences is placing them in the proper perspective and understanding the contexts of their time and today. “When the Gullwing came out, it was a complete halo car, an UFO in its time,” Wagener says. “And when you look back, it’s a classic car, so it’s traditional luxury. But at that time, it was progressive luxury. So that means that the interpretation and the meaning of luxury actually changes over time. And what we do with the electric cars right now, with the EQ sub-brand, is the progressive luxury of the future, of 25 to 30 years from now. And when we get there, it will be normal again. And then when we are in the year 2050, and we sit together with a nice mixed drink, and look back on those cars, we will say, ‘Oh, yes. It was nice. It was traditional.’ ”</p>
<p>Given the technological upheaval in the industry, it seems now may be the moment for Mercedes to create fresh expressions of what it means to be a luxury brand. Fortunately for Wagener, Mercedes has divided itself into a quartet of different sub-brands, each with their own distinct identity that can be explored and experimented with. “The good thing is, we don’t have to do it with all of our cars. Our four-brand concept gives us an opportunity to target every customer, and target every competitor,” Wagener says. “With <strong>target=&quot;_blank Mercedes-AMG</strong>, performance-luxury, we target all of the sports-car brands, Ferrari, Porsche—you name it. Mercedes-Benz, modern luxury, we talked about that. <strong>target=&quot;_blank Mercedes-Maybach</strong>, we are already the most successful ultimate luxury company, and just with one car. We will expand that. And then with EQ, we have that progressive luxury, to try new things, come up with completely different cars you have never seen before. We need to wait a little bit, but that will be a big, big change. Very progressive. This gives us the opportunity to do everything.”</p>
<p>All of this—the layers, the sub-divisions—seems like it could lead to a somewhat haphazard approach. But Wagener doesn’t think so. “No, no. It’s a very logical strategy. It’s actually very simple. It’s like with design [as a whole],” he says. “The key is to make things simple. It’s easy to put a lot of information into it. The key is to reduce it.”</p>
<p><img class="size-content-width wp-image-1308928 aligncenter" src="https://st.automobilemag.com/wp-content/mu-plugins/ten-shared/assets/images/_.gif" data-lazy="1" data-base="https://st.automobilemag.com/uploads/sites/11/2018/11/Gorden-Wagener-1-1.jpg?interpolation=lanczos-none&amp;fit=around%7C660:371" alt="" width="660" height="371" /></p>
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Source: https://www.automobilemag.com/news/mercedes-honors-visual-heritage-present-future/

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Tests uncover issues for advanced features - 23 Jun 2019 01:55

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<p>On-road and track tests are helping IIHS craft a consumer ratings program for advanced driver assistance systems. Evaluations of adaptive cruise control and active lane-keeping show variable performance in typical driving situations, such as approaching stopped vehicles and negotiating hills and curves. The early results underscore the fact that today's systems aren't robust substitutes for human drivers.</p>
<p>One of the questions researchers looked to answer is, do the systems handle driving tasks as humans would? Not always, tests showed. When they didn't perform as expected, the outcomes ranged from the irksome, such as too-cautious braking, to the dangerous, for example, veering toward the shoulder if sensors couldn't detect lane lines.</p>
<p>Adaptive cruise control (ACC) maintains a set speed and following distance from the vehicle in front. It is designed to slow for cars ahead and can come to a full stop but may not react to already-stopped vehicles. ACC doesn't react to traffic signals or other traffic controls. Active lane-keeping provides sustained steering input to keep the vehicle within its lane, but drivers must continue to hold the wheel.</p>
<p>On SAE International's scale of zero autonomy to Level 5 full autonomy, the combination of ACC and active lane-keeping is Level 2. They can assist with steering, speed control and following distance, but the human driver is still in charge and must stay on task.</p>
<p>&quot;The new tests are an outgrowth of our research on Level 2 autonomy,&quot; says Jessica Jermakian, IIHS senior research engineer. &quot;We zeroed in on situations our staff have identified as areas of concern during test drives with Level 2 systems, then used that feedback to develop road and track scenarios to compare vehicles.&quot;</p>
<p>The 2017 BMW 5-series with &quot;Driving Assistant Plus,&quot; 2017 Mercedes-Benz E-Class with &quot;Drive Pilot,&quot; 2018 Tesla Model 3 and 2016 Model S with &quot;Autopilot&quot; (software versions 8.1 and 7.1, respectively) and 2018 Volvo S90 with &quot;Pilot Assist&quot; were evaluated. All five have automatic emergency braking systems rated superior by IIHS.</p>
<h2>Adaptive cruise control</h2>
<p>Engineers evaluated ACC systems in four different series of track tests to see how they handle stopped lead vehicles and lead vehicles exiting the lane, and how the systems accelerate and decelerate.</p>
<p>One series involved driving at 31 mph toward a stationary vehicle target with ACC off and autobrake turned on to evaluate autobrake performance. Only the two Teslas hit the stationary target in this test.</p>
<p>The same test was repeated with ACC engaged and set to close, middle and far following distance in multiple runs.</p>
<p>With ACC active, the 5-series, E-Class, Model 3 and Model S braked earlier and gentler than with emergency braking and still avoided the target. The cars slowed with relatively gradual decelerations of 0.2-0.3 gs, braking in the same manner no matter the distance setting. Braking before impact was earlier for the Teslas than for the 5 series and E-Class.</p>
<p>The S90 braked more abruptly than the other models with ACC active, similar to its autobrake performance. In the ACC test, the S90 braked at a forceful 1.1g, just 1.1 seconds before impact to avoid the collision.</p>
<p>A third scenario involved following a lead vehicle that slows down to a stop and then accelerates. Every ACC system decelerated smoothly in this test.</p>
<p>A fourth scenario involved the test vehicle following a lead vehicle, which then changed lanes to reveal a stationary inflatable target vehicle in the path ahead when the time to collision was about 4.3 seconds.</p>
<p>None of the vehicles crashed into the target, and the 5 series, E-Class and Teslas all braked earlier and gentler than the S90, similar to the active ACC test.</p>
<p>Track tests are good for evaluating capability and performance in a controlled environment but not for assessing performance in traffic. Under ideal conditions, advanced driver assistance systems may function better than they do in more complex driving situations.</p>
<p>A case in point is the stopped-vehicle ACC tests. On the track, the 5 series, E-Class and Teslas braked to avoid the target vehicle. This was the case even though the owner's manuals for all the test vehicles warn that ACC may not brake when it encounters vehicles that are already stopped when they come into sensor range.</p>
<p>Out on the road, engineers noted instances in which each vehicle except the Model 3 failed to respond to stopped vehicles ahead.</p>
<p>Jermakian recounts her experience with the E-Class on U.S. 33 near the IIHS-HLDI Vehicle Research Center (VRC). Traveling about 55 mph with ACC and active lane-keeping engaged but not following a lead vehicle, the E-Class system briefly detected a pickup truck stopped at a traffic light ahead but promptly lost sight of it and continued at speed until she hit the brakes.</p>
<p>&quot;At IIHS we are coached to intervene without warning, but other drivers might not be as vigilant,&quot; Jermakian says. &quot;ACC systems require drivers to pay attention to what the vehicle is doing at all times and be ready to brake manually.&quot;</p>
<p>Unnecessary or overly cautious braking is an issue IIHS noted in the Model 3. In 180 miles, the car unexpectedly slowed down 12 times, seven of which coincided with tree shadows on the road. The others were for oncoming vehicles in another lane or vehicles crossing the road far ahead.</p>
<p>&quot;The braking events we observed didn't create unsafe conditions because the decelerations were mild and short enough that the vehicle didn't slow too much. However, unnecessary braking could pose crash risks in heavy traffic, especially if it's more forceful,&quot; Jermakian says.</p>
<p>&quot;Plus, drivers who feel that their car brakes erratically may choose not to use adaptive cruise control and would miss out on any safety benefit from the system.&quot;</p>
<p>The outlook is promising for the potential safety benefits of ACC. The technology is often bundled with forward collision warning and autobrake, and research by IIHS and HLDI has found crash-reduction benefits for these systems combined. A federally sponsored study found that drivers using ACC have longer, safer following distances than drivers who don't use ACC. Still, IIHS tests indicate that current ACC systems aren't ready to handle speed control in all traffic situations.</p>
<h2>Active lane-keeping</h2>
<p>Engineers focused on two situations that challenge active lane-keeping systems — curves and hills — in tests on open roads with no other vehicles around. They also observed how the systems performed in traffic.</p>
<p>All five systems provide steering assistance that centers the vehicle within clearly marked lanes. They also may use a lead vehicle as a guide when traveling at lower speeds or when the lead vehicle is blocking the system's view of the lane markers ahead.</p>
<p>To test active lane-keeping on curves, engineers conducted six trials with each vehicle on three different sections of road with radii ranging from 1,300 to 2,000 feet.</p>
<p>Only the Model 3 stayed within the lane on all 18 trials. The Model S was similar but overcorrected on one curve, causing it to cross the line on the inside of the curve in one trial. None of the other systems tested provided enough steering input on their own to consistently stay in their lane, often requiring the driver to provide additional steering to successfully navigate the curve.</p>
<p>The E-Class stayed within the lane in 9 of 17 runs and strayed to the lane marker in five trials. The system disengaged itself in one trial and crossed the line in two. The 5 series stayed within the lane in 3 of 16 trials and was more likely to disengage than steer outside the lane. The S90 stayed in the lane in 9 of 17 runs and crossed the lane line in eight runs.</p>
<p>When trying out new vehicles in hilly Central Virginia, home to the VRC, engineers noted early on that advanced driver assistance systems that rely on seeing road markings to keep vehicles in their lanes were sometimes flummoxed by hills. As a vehicle crests a hill, the lane markers on the road beyond are obscured.</p>
<p>For the on-road tests, engineers mapped out a course that included three hills with different slopes. Drivers made six trial runs on each hill in each vehicle.</p>
<p>The E-Class stayed in its lane in 15 of 18 trials and on the line in one trial, continuously providing steering support without erratic moves when lane lines weren't visible. The Model 3 also stayed in the lane in all but one trial, when it hugged the line.</p>
<p>In contrast, the 5-series, Model S and S90 struggled. The 5-series steered toward or across the lane line regularly, requiring drivers to override the steering support to get it back on track. Sometimes the car disengaged steering assistance on its own. The car failed to stay in the lane on all 14 valid trials.</p>
<p>The Model S was errant in the hill tests, staying in the lane in 5 of 18 trials. When cresting hills, the Model S swerved left and right until it determined the correct place in the lane, jolting test drivers. It rarely warned them to take over as it hunted for the lane center. The car regularly veered into the adjacent lanes or onto the shoulder.</p>
<p>When drivers intervened to avoid potential trouble, the active lane-keeping system disengaged. Steering assistance only resumed after drivers re-engaged Autopilot.</p>
<p>The S90 stayed in the lane in 9 of 16 trials. The car crossed the lane line in two trials and in four trials disengaged steering assistance when it crested hills but automatically re-engaged when the system once again detected the markings.</p>
<p>One issue drivers noted among some of the vehicles was a propensity to follow a lead vehicle into the exit lane in slow-moving traffic, even though the driver intended to stay the course. When a car is traveling too slow to track lane lines, active lane-keeping systems use the vehicle in front as a guide. If the lead vehicle exits, the trailing car might, too.</p>
<p class="desktop-only The evidence for safety benefits of active lane-keeping systems isn't as pronounced as for ACC. Still, the potential to prevent crashes and save lives is large. IIHS research shows that preventing lane-departure crashes could save nearly 8,000 lives in a typical year (see " [https:="" www.iihs.org="" ihs="" r="" tatusreport="" rticle="" 5="" new="" estimates="" of="" benefits="" crash="" avoidance="" features="" on="" passenger="" vehicles],"="" may="" 20,="" 2010).="" lane-departure="" warning="" systems="" are="" associated="" with="" an="" 11="" percent="" reduction="" in="" the="" rates="" single-vehicle,="" sideswipe="" and="" head-on="" crashes="" all="" severities="" a="" 21="" injury="" same="" types="" (see="" "[https:="" 2="" stay="" within="" lines:="" lane="" departure="" warning,="" blind="" spot="" detection="" help="" drivers="" avoid="" trouble],"="" aug.="" 23,="" 2017).<=""> </p>
<p class="mobile-only The evidence for safety benefits of active lane-keeping systems isn't as pronounced as for ACC. Still, the potential to prevent crashes and save lives is large. IIHS research shows that preventing lane-departure crashes could save nearly 8,000 lives in a typical year. Lane-departure warning systems are associated with an 11 percent reduction in the rates of single-vehicle, sideswipe and head-on crashes of all severities and a 21 percent reduction in the rates of injury crashes of the same types.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;h2&gt;More research before ratings&lt;/h2&gt; &lt;p&gt;IIHS continues to run track and on-road tests as it moves toward a consumer rating system for advanced driver assistance systems. Apart from questions about whether the systems perform as drivers expect, one of the many factors to consider is how much of the driving task can safely be handed over to technology without drivers checking out altogether?&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;" designers="" are="" struggling="" with="" trade-offs="" inherent="" in="" automated="" assistance,"="" says="" david="" zuby,="" iihs="" chief="" research="" officer.="" "if="" they="" limit="" functionality="" to="" keep="" drivers="" engaged,="" risk="" a="" backlash="" that="" the="" systems="" too="" rudimentary.="" if="" seem="" capable,="" then="" may="" not="" give="" them="" attention="" required="" use="" safely."<=""> </p>
<p>Real-world crashes involving vehicles with Level 2 automation demonstrate the matter isn't settled.</p>
<p>&quot;We're not ready to say yet which company has the safest implementation of Level 2 driver assistance, but it's important to note that none of these vehicles is capable of driving safely on its own,&quot; Zuby says. &quot;A production autonomous vehicle that can go anywhere, anytime isn't available at your local car dealer and won't be for quite some time. We aren't there yet.&quot;</p>
<p class="center rightborder Car staying in lane

Source: https://www.iihs.org/iihs/news/desktopnews/evaluating-autonomy-iihs-examines-driver-assistance-features-in-road-track-tests - Comments: 0

Top 10 best family hatchbacks 2019 - 20 Jun 2019 01:39

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<p>The fourth-generation Mazda 3 could well be the best looking family hatch currently on sale. And, joy of joys, it retains all the qualities that made its predecessor such an appealing contender in this highly competitive class: strong value for money; spry handling; and an atmospheric petrol engine.</p>
<p>Inside, it’s now more competitive against the likes of the Volkswagen Golf, with higher levels of perceived quality than ever before. It has Ford Focus rivalling levels of driver appeal, too, courtesy of its quick, direct steering; precise and tactilely-pleasing manual ‘box; intuitive body control and abundant grip levels. It’s motor doesn’t quite provide enough punch to see it topple the best in class, but a forthcoming compression-ignition petrol engine could well change that.</p>
<p><strong>Save money with new Mazda 3&nbsp;deals from What Car?</strong></p>
<p><img alt="" class="image-body-image" height="600" src="https://www.autocar.co.uk/sites/autocar.co.uk/files/styles/body-image/public/1-mazda-3-2019-uk-fd-hero-front.jpg?itok=iMeK9o46" width="900" /></p>
<p>It’s third time lucky for the South Korean manufacturer,&nbsp;as this third-generation Ceed&nbsp;is the first of its kind to break into our top five.&nbsp;</p>
<p>The handling and steering have found a greater level of sophistication than ever before, while its cabin offers plenty of room for four adults but still lacks some of the polish of more upmarket contenders such as the Volkswagen Golf. Its diesel engines are smooth and refined and offer impressive economy&nbsp;too.&nbsp;</p>
<p>It is still some way off the position of class leader, but is nonetheless a worthy competitor in an&nbsp;incredibly competitive segment.</p>
<p><strong>Save money with new Ceed&nbsp;deals from What Car?</strong></p>
<p><img alt="" class="image-body-image" height="600" src="https://www.autocar.co.uk/sites/autocar.co.uk/files/styles/body-image/public/kia-ceed_0.jpg?itok=EGn-XHTv" width="900" /></p>
<p>Over the course of&nbsp;ten models, the Honda Civic has gone through a multitude of changes from the mundane to the divisive. This new-generation car is equally as striking as its predecessors, but in a more conventional way, and as a result is better executed than before. </p>

Source: https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/best-cars/top-10-best-family-hatchbacks

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Riding Across the Great Divide - 16 Jun 2019 02:42

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<h3><em><strong>Motorcycling along the Continental Divide through Colorado and New Mexico.</strong></em></h3>
<figure id="attachment_54189" class="size-full wp-image-54189" data-rel="lightbox-image-0" data-magnific_type="image" data-rl_title="" data-rl_caption="" title=" &lt;img data-attachment-id=" 54189"="" data-permalink="https://ridermagazine.com/2018/09/04/riding-across-the-great-divide/14-4/" data-orig-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/14.jpg" data-orig-size="800,450" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;COPYRIGHT, 2011&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;" data-image-title="14" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/14-300x169.jpg" data-large-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/14.jpg" src="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/14.jpg" alt="Continental Divide Ride" width="800" height="450" srcset="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/14.jpg 800w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/14-300x169.jpg 300w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/14-768x432.jpg 768w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/14-696x392.jpg 696w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/14-747x420.jpg 747w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px"></figure>]
<figcaption class="size-full wp-image-54185" attachment_54185"="" data-rel="lightbox-image-1" data-magnific_type="image" data-rl_title="" data-rl_caption="" title=" &lt;img data-attachment-id=" 54185"="" data-permalink="https://ridermagazine.com/2018/09/04/riding-across-the-great-divide/2-6/" data-orig-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/2.jpg" data-orig-size="800,450" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;COPYRIGHT, 2011&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;" data-image-title="2" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/2-300x169.jpg" data-large-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/2.jpg" src="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/2.jpg" alt="Continental Divide Ride" width="800" height="450" srcset="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/2.jpg 800w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/2-300x169.jpg 300w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/2-768x432.jpg 768w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/2-696x392.jpg 696w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/2-747x420.jpg 747w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px"></figcaption>]
<figcaption class="size-full wp-image-54187" attachment_54187"="" data-rel="lightbox-image-2" data-magnific_type="image" data-rl_title="" data-rl_caption="" title=" &lt;img data-attachment-id=" 54187"="" data-permalink="https://ridermagazine.com/2018/09/04/riding-across-the-great-divide/4-5/" data-orig-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/4.jpg" data-orig-size="800,600" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;" data-image-title="4" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/4-300x225.jpg" data-large-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/4.jpg" src="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/4.jpg" alt="Continental Divide Ride" width="800" height="600" srcset="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/4.jpg 800w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/4-300x225.jpg 300w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/4-768x576.jpg 768w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/4-80x60.jpg 80w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/4-265x198.jpg 265w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/4-696x522.jpg 696w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/4-560x420.jpg 560w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px"></figcaption>]
<figcaption class="size-full wp-image-54188" attachment_54188"="" data-rel="lightbox-image-3" data-magnific_type="image" data-rl_title="" data-rl_caption="" title=" &lt;img data-attachment-id=" 54188"="" data-permalink="https://ridermagazine.com/2018/09/04/riding-across-the-great-divide/11-4/" data-orig-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/11.jpg" data-orig-size="800,600" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;" data-image-title="11" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/11-300x225.jpg" data-large-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/11.jpg" src="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/11.jpg" alt="Continental Divide Ride" width="800" height="600" srcset="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/11.jpg 800w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/11-300x225.jpg 300w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/11-768x576.jpg 768w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/11-80x60.jpg 80w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/11-265x198.jpg 265w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/11-696x522.jpg 696w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/11-560x420.jpg 560w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px"></figcaption>]
<figcaption class="size-full wp-image-54186" attachment_54186"="" data-rel="lightbox-image-4" data-magnific_type="image" data-rl_title="" data-rl_caption="" title=" &lt;img data-attachment-id=" 54186"="" data-permalink="https://ridermagazine.com/2018/09/04/riding-across-the-great-divide/3-7/" data-orig-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/3.jpg" data-orig-size="800,600" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;" data-image-title="3" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/3-300x225.jpg" data-large-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/3.jpg" src="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/3.jpg" alt="Continental Divide Ride" width="800" height="600" srcset="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/3.jpg 800w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/3-300x225.jpg 300w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/3-768x576.jpg 768w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/3-80x60.jpg 80w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/3-265x198.jpg 265w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/3-696x522.jpg 696w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/3-560x420.jpg 560w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px"></figcaption>]
<figcaption class="size-full wp-image-54190" attachment_54190"="" data-rel="lightbox-image-5" data-magnific_type="image" data-rl_title="" data-rl_caption="" title=" &lt;img data-attachment-id=" 54190"="" data-permalink="https://ridermagazine.com/2018/09/04/riding-across-the-great-divide/attachment/23/" data-orig-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/23.jpg" data-orig-size="800,450" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;COPYRIGHT, 2011&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;" data-image-title="23" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/23-300x169.jpg" data-large-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/23.jpg" src="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/23.jpg" alt="Continental Divide Ride" width="800" height="450" srcset="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/23.jpg 800w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/23-300x169.jpg 300w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/23-768x432.jpg 768w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/23-696x392.jpg 696w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/23-747x420.jpg 747w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px"></figcaption>]
<figcaption class="size-full wp-image-54191" attachment_54191"="" data-rel="lightbox-image-6" data-magnific_type="image" data-rl_title="" data-rl_caption="" title=" &lt;img data-attachment-id=" 54191"="" data-permalink="https://ridermagazine.com/2018/09/04/riding-across-the-great-divide/25-2/" data-orig-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/25.jpg" data-orig-size="800,600" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;" data-image-title="25" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/25-300x225.jpg" data-large-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/25.jpg" src="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/25.jpg" alt="Continental Divide Ride" width="800" height="600" srcset="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/25.jpg 800w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/25-300x225.jpg 300w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/25-768x576.jpg 768w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/25-80x60.jpg 80w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/25-265x198.jpg 265w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/25-696x522.jpg 696w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/25-560x420.jpg 560w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px"></figcaption>]
<figcaption class="size-large wp-image-54192" attachment_54192"="" data-rel="lightbox-image-7" data-magnific_type="image" data-rl_title="" data-rl_caption="" title=" &lt;img data-attachment-id=" 54192"="" data-permalink="https://ridermagazine.com/2018/09/04/riding-across-the-great-divide/continental-divide-cmyk/" data-orig-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/continental-divide-cmyk.jpg" data-orig-size="800,1489" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;" data-image-title="continental-divide-cmyk" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/continental-divide-cmyk-161x300.jpg" data-large-file="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/continental-divide-cmyk-550x1024.jpg" src="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/continental-divide-cmyk-550x1024.jpg" alt="Continental Divide Ride" width="550" height="1024" srcset="https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/continental-divide-cmyk-550x1024.jpg 550w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/continental-divide-cmyk-161x300.jpg 161w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/continental-divide-cmyk-768x1429.jpg 768w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/continental-divide-cmyk-696x1295.jpg 696w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/continental-divide-cmyk-226x420.jpg 226w, https://ridermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/continental-divide-cmyk.jpg 800w" sizes="(max-width: 550px) 100vw, 550px"></figcaption>]
<figcaption class="wp-caption-text A map of the route taken, by Bill Tipton/compartmaps.com.&lt;/figcaption&gt;&lt;/figure&gt; &lt;p&gt; &lt;h3 class=" jp-relatedposts-headline="" <em="">
Related
<p></p>

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Source: https://ridermagazine.com/2018/09/04/riding-across-the-great-divide/

</figcaption> - Comments: 0

Late Delivery? Tesla Says It’ll Cover Your Tax Credit S - 13 Jun 2019 03:38

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<p>[https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=1654056&amp;preview=true <img data-attachment-id="1635318" data-permalink="" data-orig-file="https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/model-3-interior.jpeg" data-orig-size="1000,750" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;" data-image-title="model 3 interior" data-image-description="&lt;p&gt;tesla&lt;/p&gt;
" data-medium-file="https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/model-3-interior-450x338.jpeg" data-large-file="https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/model-3-interior-610x458.jpeg" class="aligncenter wp-image-1635318 size-large" src="https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/model-3-interior-610x458.jpeg" alt="" width="610" height="458" srcset="https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/model-3-interior-610x458.jpeg 610w, https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/model-3-interior-75x56.jpeg 75w, https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/model-3-interior-450x338.jpeg 450w, https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/model-3-interior-768x576.jpeg 768w, https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/model-3-interior-120x90.jpeg 120w, https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/model-3-interior.jpeg 1000w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" />]</p>
<p>Having rung the bell on 200,000 electric vehicle deliveries in the U.S., Tesla will enter 2019 without the ability to offer a full $7,500 federal tax credit to would-be buyers. While not nearly as attractive an incentive as the same amount applied to a lower-priced EV, it’s still free public dollars. And it’s better than $3,750.</p>
<p>Twice this past fall, Tesla CEO Elon Musk warned customers they’d need to order by a certain date in order to ensure a delivery date prior to January 1st. After receiving a holiday earful from dutiful customers now facing late deliveries, Musk put on the Santa suit.<span id="more-1654056 &lt;/span&gt;&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;“If Tesla committed delivery &amp; customer made good faith efforts to receive before year end, Tesla will cover the tax credit difference,” the CEO tweeted on Saturday.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;Under the rules laid out by the Obama administration (and kept in place by the Trump administration), the tax credit amount drops by half after automakers deliver 200,000 eligible vehicles in the United States. The halving comes one full quarter after the quarter in which the OEM hits the mark. For Tesla, that mark came in the third quarter of 2018, making the first quarter of 2019 the point at which the credit shaves half its bills. It halves again starting in July 2019, then disappears six months later.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;While Tesla guaranteed timely delivery of vehicles purchased up to November 30th, it seems several slipped through the cracks. Musk later pinned the company’s promise to the top of his Twitter page. In response to a customer, the CEO added that deliveries of all Mid-Range Model 3 sedans (currently, the cheapest Tesla you can actually get your hands on) are expected before January 1st.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;Once the credit halves and Musk’s IOUs run out, holdouts for the long-awaited base Model 3 will find themselves with less of an incentive than they may have initially anticipated. Musk claims production of the $35,000 car will begin in the first quarter of 2019. In October, he mentioned that offering a Model 3 at that price too soon would essentially sink the company.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;[Image: Tesla]&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt; &lt;h3 class=" jp-relatedposts-headline="" <em="">Related </span></p>

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Source: https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2018/12/late-delivery-tesla-says-itll-cover-your-tax-credit-shortfall/ - Comments: 0

Massive Fine Imposed on Tata Dealer as They Sold an Old - 10 Jun 2019 03:20

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<p>Dealerships are responsible for so many warm memories and emotions like getting a new vehicle home, the last thing you’d want is for to be associated with feeling cheated. This dealership managed to sell an old car as new to one of its customers, fortunately, it was later caught and fined heavily. According to The&nbsp;<em>Times of India</em>, Tata Motors Mumbai, Metro Motors of Ambala, Berkeley Tata Motors of Chandigarh and Banarsi Das Automobiles of Panchkula and has been found guilty for selling an old car as new to the customers. The dealership, service center and Tata Motors have been penalized for cheating the customer.&nbsp; It all began on the 10<sup>th</sup>&nbsp;of January 2015, when Mr. Atul Kumar Aggarwal of Panchkula purchased a Tata car from Banarsi Das Automobiles, Panchkula for Rs. 3.61 lakh. After some time, the car started having problems and apparently developed unanticipated issues, which led him to take his car for its first service on February 8, 2015.</p>
<p><img class="am_content_image aligncenter" title="Tata Motors comes one step closer towards automotive electrification in Madhya Pradesh " src="https://i2.wp.com/www.motoroids.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Tata-Motors-comes-one-step-closer-towards-automotive-electrification-in-Madhya-Pradesh-2.jpg?resize=600%2C422&amp;ssl=1" data-postid="328841" alt="Tata Motors comes one step closer towards automotive electrification in Madhya Pradesh " width="600" height="422" data-imageid="321841" data-recalc-dims="1" /></p>
<p>Post the first service there was no improvement even though the full service had been conducted. Even after multiple attempts by mechanics to figure out the problem and fix the car, it showed no sign of improvement. Fed up with these issues, Atul Kumar finally filed a complaint at the District Consumer Disputes Redressal Forum. The car was then inspected in the presence of all parties by a committee constituted by the PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh on November 30, 2017.&nbsp; The report submitted by the committee revealed that even after replacing the injector, turbocharger, fuel lines and repairing the alternator, the problem of emission of black smoke existed. There was also a problem with the cold start and pick-up of the vehicle. After a thorough inspection and test driving the car, the committee stated that the problems were there in the vehicle as stated by the complainant.</p>
<p><img class="am_content_image aligncenter" title="rp_Tata-Indica-Vista-Facelift.jpg" src="https://i2.wp.com/www.motoroids.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Tata-Indica-Vista-Facelift.jpg?resize=540%2C473&amp;ssl=1" data-postid="328841" alt="rp_Tata-Indica-Vista-Facelift.jpg" width="540" height="473" data-imageid="92182" data-recalc-dims="1" /></p>
<p>The forum, after going through all the evidence, came to the conclusion that Banarsi Das Automobiles had actually sold an accidental repaired car to the customer intentionally. Berkeley Tata Motors (service center) and Tata Motors as a manufacturer were also found to be guilty in this incident. The forum has instructed all the concerned parties to pay a compensation of Rs. 1 lakh for indulging in unfair trade practices. It also directed the dealer to refund the full amount paid by the complainant with interest or replace the old car with a new one. Thus, the forum brought justice to the consumer. Knowing how dealerships are capable of lying through their teeth and incidents like this, it is now very important for a customer and buyers to be fully satisfied before driving a vehicle home. Though justice has been served, the customer had to go through some traumatic situations which may have left a rather sour taste of ownership in his mouth, even after being fully compensated.</p>
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[[image https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/92/Rugby_car.JPG/1200px-Rugby_car.JPG&quot;/&gt;

Source: https://www.motoroids.com/news/massive-fine-imposed-on-tata-dealer-as-they-sold-an-old-tata-car-as-new-court-orders-full-replacement/ - Comments: 0

Peugeot e-Legend Concept : et si le passé avait un aven - 04 Jun 2019 02:38

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<p><img data-attachment-id="320703" data-permalink="https://blogautomobile.fr/peugeot-e-legend-concept-320475/peugeot-elegend-concept-40" data-orig-file="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-40.jpg" data-orig-size="1600,1067" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;2018 TOUT DROIT RESERVE&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;" data-image-title="Peugeot eLegend Concept 40" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-40-760x507.jpg" data-large-file="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-40.jpg" class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-320703" src="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-40.jpg" alt="" width="1600" height="1067" srcset="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-40.jpg 1600w, https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-40-760x507.jpg 760w, https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-40-1440x960.jpg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1600px) 100vw, 1600px" /></p>
<p>Qui a dit qu’une voiture &eacute;lectrique autonome &eacute;tait forc&eacute;ment ennuyeuse&nbsp;? Peugeot frappe tr&egrave;s fort avec son concept e-Legend, coup&eacute; &eacute;lectrique rac&eacute;, annonciateur d’un futur que l’on esp&egrave;re radieux.</p>
<p>Peugeot, s’il vous pla&icirc;t&nbsp;: sortez-nous ce concept en s&eacute;rie&nbsp;! M&ecirc;me en petites quantit&eacute;s, m&ecirc;me avec un simple 4 cylindres, m&ecirc;me (surtout ?) sans conduite autonome. Mais produisez-le&nbsp;!! Il n’y a plus aucune voiture 3 portes au catalogue des marques fran&ccedil;aises (non Twizy et e-Mehari, &ccedil;a ne compte pas), c’est une occasion unique&nbsp;: alors allez-y, faites-nous r&ecirc;ver&nbsp;!</p>
<p><img data-attachment-id="320700" data-permalink="https://blogautomobile.fr/peugeot-e-legend-concept-320475/peugeot-elegend-concept-38" data-orig-file="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-38.jpg" data-orig-size="1600,1067" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;" data-image-title="Peugeot eLegend Concept – 38" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-38-760x507.jpg" data-large-file="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-38.jpg" class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-320700" src="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-38.jpg" alt="" width="1600" height="1067" srcset="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-38.jpg 1600w, https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-38-760x507.jpg 760w, https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-38-1440x960.jpg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1600px) 100vw, 1600px" /></p>
<p>Bon, je me calme, un petit verre d’eau et je reprends. Vous avez donc sous vos yeux &eacute;bahis un hommage modernis&eacute; de Peugeot &agrave; l’ind&eacute;modable 504 coup&eacute; de Pininfarina. L’inspiration du dessin ext&eacute;rieur est ind&eacute;niable, quel que soit l’angle de vue. e-Legend reprend de profil le dessin quasi sym&eacute;trique des capots et coffre, en raccourcissant nettement ce dernier pour plus de dynamisme. Les doubles optiques LED sont enfonc&eacute;es dans une fine calandre verticale noire, rev&ecirc;tue d’un lion lumineux que l’on dirait tout droit sorti d’une 404. Cette calandre surplombe une &eacute;paisse zone technique abritant les capteurs de conduite autonome. Ce bourrelet est h&eacute;las assez massif et m&eacute;riterait d’&ecirc;tre un peu mieux int&eacute;gr&eacute;.</p>
<p>Sur la poupe, les feux &agrave; 3 griffes ont le dessin plus moderne des derni&egrave;res productions de la marque, mais sont aussi un hommage appuy&eacute; aux feux de la premi&egrave;re s&eacute;rie de 504 coup&eacute;. Ne cherchez pas plus loin l’inspiration des feux de votre 3008. L&agrave; aussi, une zone technique noire est pr&eacute;sente.</p>
<p><img data-attachment-id="320686" data-permalink="https://blogautomobile.fr/peugeot-e-legend-concept-320475/peugeot-elegend-concept-24" data-orig-file="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-24.jpg" data-orig-size="1600,1068" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;2014 TOUS DROITS RESERVES&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;" data-image-title="Peugeot eLegend Concept – 24" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-24-760x507.jpg" data-large-file="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-24.jpg" class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-320686" src="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-24.jpg" alt="" width="1600" height="1068" srcset="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-24.jpg 1600w, https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-24-760x507.jpg 760w, https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-24-1440x961.jpg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1600px) 100vw, 1600px" /></p>
<p>Les flancs reprennent les proportions de la 504 coup&eacute; d’origine. Mais les courbes sont ici remplac&eacute;es par des surfaces planes, seyant tr&egrave;s bien &agrave; la vocation sportive du coup&eacute;. Petit morceau de bravoure de designer&nbsp;: les passages de roue sont trait&eacute;s en creux. Et ce n’est pas tout&nbsp;: la lunette arri&egrave;re n’est pas compos&eacute;e d’un seul tenant, mais de 3 facettes. Jolie figure de style dans les deux cas.</p>
<p>Le pavillon reprend l’esprit d’un hard top, au point que l’on pourrait ais&eacute;ment dessiner un cabriolet sur cette base de coup&eacute;. La custode re&ccedil;oit un discret &eacute;cran LED, configurable, permettant de conna&icirc;tre le niveau de charge ou d’indiquer que la voiture roule en mode autonome. Il peut aussi afficher des messages personnalis&eacute;s (merci Peugeot&nbsp;!). L&agrave; aussi, il s’agit d’un rappel visuel &agrave; la 504 Coup&eacute;.</p>
<p><img data-attachment-id="320676" data-permalink="https://blogautomobile.fr/peugeot-e-legend-concept-320475/peugeot-elegend-concept-14" data-orig-file="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-14.jpg" data-orig-size="1600,1068" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;2014 TOUS DROITS RESERVES&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;" data-image-title="Peugeot eLegend Concept – 14" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-14-760x507.jpg" data-large-file="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-14.jpg" class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-320676" src="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-14.jpg" alt="" width="1600" height="1068" srcset="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-14.jpg 1600w, https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-14-760x507.jpg 760w, https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-14-1440x961.jpg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1600px) 100vw, 1600px" /></p>
<p>Les apparences de compacit&eacute; du concept e-Legend sont trompeuses&nbsp;: il s’&eacute;tire sur 4,65 m de long, pour une largeur de 1,93 m. Pour une fois, pas de jantes chrom&eacute;es de 28″, mais de plus modestes et r&eacute;alistes 19″. La peinture appliqu&eacute;e sur le coup&eacute; a fait l’objet d’un d&eacute;veloppement sp&eacute;cial. Selon l’&eacute;clairage, son coloris passe du chrome au bronze poli. Rabl&eacute; et rac&eacute;, e-Legend n’est pas sans rappeler &eacute;galement une Camaro, une Mustang, ou m&ecirc;me le concept Nissan IDx, qui revisitait lui aussi un coup&eacute; historique.</p>
<p><img data-attachment-id="320690" data-permalink="https://blogautomobile.fr/peugeot-e-legend-concept-320475/peugeot-elegend-concept-27" data-orig-file="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-27.jpg" data-orig-size="1600,1068" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;2014 TOUS DROITS RESERVES&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;" data-image-title="Peugeot eLegend Concept – 27" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-27-760x507.jpg" data-large-file="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-27.jpg" class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-320690" src="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-27.jpg" alt="" width="1600" height="1068" srcset="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-27.jpg 1600w, https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-27-760x507.jpg 760w, https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-27-1440x961.jpg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1600px) 100vw, 1600px" /></p>
<p>Dans l’habitacle, Peugeot a pouss&eacute; son id&eacute;e jusqu’au bout en r&eacute;habilitant le velours&nbsp;! Cette &eacute;toffe ayant fait les beaux jours des habitacles Peugeot des ann&eacute;es 70 fait ici son come-back. J’esp&egrave;re que les sous pulls en acrylique resteront &agrave; l’&eacute;tat de souvenir, ceux qui ont connu s’en souviendront avec &eacute;motion. Le velours bleu utilis&eacute; ici est n&eacute;anmoins bien diff&eacute;rent en utilisant des techniques de tissage plus moderne. Il habille des si&egrave;ges qui semblent tout droit tir&eacute;s eux aussi d’une 504. L’ambiance g&eacute;n&eacute;rale se veut chaleureuse avec des inclusions de bois sur la console centrale, les contre-portes et les seuils de porte.</p>
<p>Concession &agrave; la modernit&eacute;, e-Legend se dote de gigantesques &eacute;crans LCD pour habiller la planche de bord et les portes. Enti&egrave;rement configurables, ils peuvent tour &agrave; tout imiter un habillage bois, se parer de lignes d&eacute;coratives, servir d’&eacute;cran GPS ou multim&eacute;dia. J’avoue regretter un combin&eacute; d’instrumentations plus classique&nbsp;: quelques compteurs &agrave; a aiguille avec une casquette pare soleil, un petit volant trois branches en cuir, ce serait parfait (ah… nostalgie). A propos de volant, justement, celui-ci est r&eacute;tractable. Car e-Legend est bien s&ucirc;r une voiture autonome. Mais Peugeot va plus loin que d’autres concepts du m&ecirc;me genre en pr&ocirc;nant simultan&eacute;ment le plaisir de conduite.</p>
<p>C’est ainsi que deux modes autonomes sont propos&eacute;s&nbsp;: Soft (typ&eacute; confort) et Sharp, plus dynamique. Les modes de conduite traditionnelle sont &eacute;galement au nombre de deux&nbsp;: Legend (plut&ocirc;t &laquo;&nbsp;p&eacute;p&egrave;re&nbsp;&raquo;) et Boost, ax&eacute; performances. Les ambiances int&eacute;rieures et les instrumentations s’adaptent suivant les modes, le volant pouvant se r&eacute;tracter dans la planche de bord dans les modes autonomes pour d&eacute;gager un espace &agrave; vivre.</p>
<p>Le coup&eacute; e-Legend est 100% &eacute;lectrique, comme la quasi-totalit&eacute; des concepts du moment. Son moteur dispose d’une puissance de 462 ch et 800 Nm de couple. Les batteries sont quant &agrave; elles d’une capacit&eacute; de respectable de 100 kWh. L’autonomie th&eacute;orique en cycle WLTP est de 600 km. Peugeot propose par ailleurs un syst&egrave;me de recharge par induction plus pratique que la classique prise (et hop, sans les mains !). Les performances sont des plus “suffisantes” : 0 &agrave; 100 km/h en 4 secondes et une vitesse maximale de 220 km/h.</p>
<p><img data-attachment-id="320697" data-permalink="https://blogautomobile.fr/peugeot-e-legend-concept-320475/peugeot-elegend-concept-34" data-orig-file="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-34.jpg" data-orig-size="1600,1067" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;" data-image-title="Peugeot eLegend Concept – 34" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-34-760x507.jpg" data-large-file="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-34.jpg" class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-320697" src="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-34.jpg" alt="" width="1600" height="1067" srcset="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-34.jpg 1600w, https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-34-760x507.jpg 760w, https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-34-1440x960.jpg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1600px) 100vw, 1600px" /></p>
<p>Le Peugeot e-Legend Concept se veut selon son constructeur bien plus qu’un simple concept, en se posant comme la pierre angulaire de l’avenir de la marque. Rien de moins ! Et c’est vrai qu’il coche toutes les cases habituelles&nbsp;: &eacute;lectrique, autonome, mais il ajoute surtout le plaisir de conduite, mainte fois n&eacute;glig&eacute; sur les concepts actuels. Et surtout, il se pr&eacute;sente sous une forme devenue bien rare en ces temps de SUVite aig&uuml;e. Car rouler dans une belle voiture, dont on est fier, c’est aussi un de ces petits plaisirs faciles qui nous est trop souvent refus&eacute;.</p>
<p><img data-attachment-id="320726" data-permalink="https://blogautomobile.fr/peugeot-e-legend-concept-320475/peugeot-elegend-concept-97" data-orig-file="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-97.jpg" data-orig-size="1600,1067" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;2018 TOUT DROIT RESERVE&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;" data-image-title="Peugeot eLegend Concept – 97" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-97-760x507.jpg" data-large-file="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-97.jpg" class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-320726" src="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-97.jpg" alt="" width="1600" height="1067" srcset="https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-97.jpg 1600w, https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-97-760x507.jpg 760w, https://blogautomobile.fr/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Peugeot-eLegend-Concept-97-1440x960.jpg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1600px) 100vw, 1600px" /></p>
<p>Il semble d’ailleurs tellement proche de la r&eacute;alit&eacute;, que forc&eacute;ment la question d’une &eacute;ventuelle production en s&eacute;rie se pose, pour en d&eacute;river une 508 Coup&eacute;. Mais si Peugeot a pour habitude de r&eacute;cup&eacute;rer des bribes de ses concepts pour les adapter &agrave; des mod&egrave;les de s&eacute;rie, il reste h&eacute;las fort improbable de voir le coup&eacute; e-Legend arpenter nos rues. C’est dommage, &agrave; moins d’un accueil exceptionnel du public&nbsp;? Alors, allez-y faites du bruit au Mondial de Paris o&ugrave; elle sera expos&eacute;e d&eacute;but octobre !</p>
<p>D’ici l&agrave;, n’h&eacute;sitez pas &agrave; l’admirer dans la superbe vid&eacute;o qu’a r&eacute;alis&eacute; notre ami Kwam&eacute; de <span><span>Planete-GT</span></span>, &agrave; d&eacute;couvrir ici :</p>
<p><em>Cr&eacute;dits photos : Ugo Missana, Peugeot</em></p>
<p><em>Cr&eacute;dits vid&eacute;o : Kwam&eacute; Adjei</em></p>

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Source: https://blogautomobile.fr/peugeot-e-legend-concept-320475 - Comments: 0

Trade War Watch: Trump Says China Will Remove Car Tarif - 01 Jun 2019 02:27

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<p>[https://wp.me/pHwPe-6VA4 <img data-attachment-id="1585380" data-permalink="" data-orig-file="https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/trump-2546104_1920-e1502906365676.jpg" data-orig-size="1209,662" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;" data-image-title="Trump" data-image-description="&lt;p&gt;Public Domain&lt;/p&gt;
" data-medium-file="https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/trump-2546104_1920-e1502906365676-450x246.jpg" data-large-file="https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/trump-2546104_1920-e1502906365676-610x334.jpg" class="aligncenter size-large wp-image-1585380" src="https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/trump-2546104_1920-e1502906365676-610x334.jpg" alt="Trump" width="610" height="334" srcset="https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/trump-2546104_1920-e1502906365676-610x334.jpg 610w, https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/trump-2546104_1920-e1502906365676-75x41.jpg 75w, https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/trump-2546104_1920-e1502906365676-450x246.jpg 450w, https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/trump-2546104_1920-e1502906365676-768x421.jpg 768w, https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/trump-2546104_1920-e1502906365676-120x66.jpg 120w, https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/trump-2546104_1920-e1502906365676.jpg 1209w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" />]</p>
<p>Last night President Donald Trump tweeted that China had agreed to reduce tariffs. While The People’s Republic already lowered tariffs over the summer, it chose to cut the United States out of that deal as trade relations worsened. In fact, America found itself subject to an increased, 40-percent fine on imported autos while the rest of the world saw their tariffs (partially) eased. But the president seems optimistic.</p>
<p>“My meeting in Argentina with President Xi of China was an extraordinary one,” Trump explained in target=&quot;_blank&quot; rel=&quot;noopener a follow-up post. “Relations with China have taken a BIG leap forward! Very good things will happen. We are dealing from great strength, but China likewise has much to gain if and when a deal is completed. Level the field!”</p>
<p>Meanwhile, China remains silent on the matter.&nbsp;<span id="more-1651312 &lt;/span&gt;&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;The stock market, on the other hand, is making noise. The announcement appears to have helped the share price of numerous automakers.&nbsp;General Motors and Daimler shares rose by more than 4 percent in premarket trading while Ford and Tesla increased by about 3 percent apiece. German manufacturers fared even better.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;However, the important question here is whether China actually plans to reduce tariffs. Diplomats from the country have been silent, asking that all questions on the issue be forwarded to the Commerce Ministry. But that body is unlikely to say anything until later this week, when it holds its&nbsp;weekly news conference. This isn’t abnormal for China, as most public communications are gone over with a fine-toothed comb prior to release. The nation is extremely careful of what it says to the public (and vice versa).&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;There’s a chance that China is weighing its options. While it could certainly renege on whatever promise was made to the president, making him look ineffectual, it might not be a good idea to further worsen trade relations — especially with so little to gain.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;Most American-branded vehicles sold in China are already built there via joint ventures with Asian firms. Only a small fraction are actually imported directly from the United States. China may feel it has less to lose by opening up the market at this juncture. However, that wouldn’t make the decision meaningful for automakers.&nbsp; “If they cancel the extra 25 percent tariff on U.S.-made cars, then we will see positive signs for imported cars,” Wang Cun, director of the China Automobile Dealers Association’s import committee, told reporters.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;According to [https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trade-china-autos/trump-tweets-china-to-cut-tax-on-us-made-cars-revs-up-auto-stocks-idUSKBN1O208X" target="_blank" rel="noopener &lt;em&gt;Reuters&lt;/em&gt;], the agreement went down following an extended&nbsp;dinner with Xi Jinping on Saturday in Buenos Aires.&nbsp;Trump agreed to postpone an increase in the tariff rate on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports to 25 percent from 10 percent that was scheduled for January. 1st. In exchange, China agreed to resume purchases of some U.S. farm and energy commodities.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;While promising, that doesn’t exactly guarantee anything specifically relating to cars and still involves a 90-day period where the two countries discuss&nbsp;China’s policies on technology transfers, intellectual property protection, non-tariff barriers, cyber intrusions and theft, services and agriculture. We expect China to make an announcement by Thursday.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt; &lt;h3 class=" jp-relatedposts-headline="" <em="">Related </span></p>

Source: https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2018/12/trade-war-watch-trump-says-china-will-remove-car-tariffs-china-claims-nothing/

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